Op. 1, Poučení synovské, (1947)

Op. 2, Piano Sonata No. 1, dedicated “To my dear mother” (1947) 13:00

Op. 3, Concerto for Chamber Orchestra “Hommage a Stravinskij”, 3 movts., (1948) 16:00. Score – ČHF

OP. 4, Sonata, 2 movts., (1948) 17:00. Score – PA, Schott

OP. 5, “Bird’s Weddings” (Ptaćĺ svatby). Cycle of songs for tenor and piano to folk poetry, (1949) 12:00. Score – Pa
U.S. Premiere, November 20, 2008, Washington Musica Viva, at the Embassy of the Czech Republic

Op, 6, String Quartet No. 1, (1949) 20:00

Op. 7, Ouvertura pro velký orchestra, (1950)

Op. 8, Concerto for violoncello and orchestra, 3 movts., (1951). 35:00. Score – Eds

Op. 9, Suita for orchestra “Festival of Straznice”, 5 parts, (1953) 28:00. Score – ČHF

Op. 10, Divertimento for Wind Quintet, 5 parts, (1952) 17:00. Score – čHF, Record – Su.

Op. 11, Suite for Oboe and Piano “Bagpiper”, (1953), 15:00. Score – Eds

Op. 12, Concerto for piano and orchestra No. 1, (1954) 20:00. Score – Pa. Record – Su

Op. 13, Classical Nonet, 4 movts., (1956) 20:00. Score – ČHF

Op. 14, Symphony No. 1, (1957) 36:00. Score – Eds

Op. 15, Children Songs with piano accompaniment, 6 parts, (1958) 12:00, Score – Eds

Op. 17, Concerto for violin and orchestra No. 1, (1959) 21:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su

Op. 18, Symphony No. 2 “Sinfonia pacis”, (1961) 27:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su, CDM

Op. 19, String Quartet No. 2, (1962) 20:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su

Op. 20, Six Two-Voice Canonic Inventions for Harpsichord, (1962) 13:00. Score – Schott, Pa, Record – Su

Op. 21, Chamber Music for String, (1963) 17:00. Score – Pa, Schott, Record – Su

Op. 22, Symphonic Fresco for organ (Afresco sinfonico), (1963) 09:00. Score – PA

Op. 23, Album of Folksongs with piano, 20 songs, 30:00.

Op. 24, Symphonic Variations, (1964) 12:00. Score – PA, Schott, Record – Su

Op. 25, Concerto for large orchestra, 4 movts., (1966) 36:00. Score – Pa, Schott, Record – Su

Op. 26, Accents, cycle of piano studies of interpretation, (1967) 8 parts, 18:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su

Op. 27, Small Chamber Music for Wind Quintet, 3 movts., (1967) 11:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su, Pa

Op. 28, Sonata for violin and harpsichord, 3 movts., (1967) 15:00. Score- Eds, Record – Su

Op. 29, Sonata for cello and piano, 3 movts., (1968-9) 18:00. Score – Pa, Schott, Record – Pa

Op. 30, Sonata for clarinet and piano, 3 movts., (1969) 18:00. Score – Pa, Record – Pa

Op. 31, Variations for French horn and piano, (1969) 8:00. Score – Schott, Eds, Record – Su

Op. 32, Sonata for trombone and piano, 2 movts., (1970) 15:00. Score – Schott, Record – Su

Op. 33, Symphony No. 3, (1971) 25:00. Score – Pa, Schott, Record – Pa, CDM
U.S. Stamford, Connecticut Premiere by Stamford Symphony Orchestra, April 25, 1999
Germany, Münster premiere by the Dresdner Staatskapelle, 1972

Op. 34, Symphony No. 4, (1972) 23:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su
Czech, Prague premiere by Czech Philharmonic, 1975,
Premiered by the Dresdner Staatskapelle, 1975

Op. 35, Three Pieces for Flute, (1973) 08:00. Score – PA / Schott, Record – Pa

Op. 36, Concerto for trumpet and orchestra (“Le Tambour de Villevielle”), 3 movts., (1973) 16:00 Score – Eds, Record – Su

Op. 37, Songs for Little Children (with piano) 05:00. Score – ČHF

Op. 38, 5 Romantic Love Songs to words by R.M.Rilke for high voice and strings (1973) 18:00. Score – ČHF, record – Su

Op. 39, Trio for Violin Cello and Piano, (1974) 15:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su
U.S. Premiere, November 20, 2008, Washington Musica Viva, at the Embassy of the Czech Republic

Op. 40, We Sing a Song with flute and oboe, 5 two- and three-canonic choirs, (1974) 08:00. Score – ČHF

Op. 41, Entrata, Aria e Toccata for piano, 3 movts., (1975) 10:00. Score – Eds

Op. 42, Concerto for harpsichord and string orchestra, (1975) 27:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su
U.S. Washington DC premiere by the Washington Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra performed 7 times, 1994

Op. 43, Symphony No. 5, “Fragment”, (1976) 15:00. Score – Pa, Schott. Record – Pa, CDM
Czech, Prague premiere by Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, 1977

Op. 44, No.2. Nonet “Homage to Nature”, 4 movts., (1976) 22:00. Score – ČHF, Record – Su

Op. 45, “The War” (Vojna) chamber cantata for mixed choir, flute, cimbalom on folk poetry, (1977) 19:00, Score – ČHF

Op. 46, Reminiscences for Guitar Solo (1977) 14:00. Score: Zimmermann, Frankfurt am Main

Op. 47, Three Children Choirs (with piano), (1977) 08:00.

Op. 48, String Quartet No. 3, (1977) 19:00. Score – Pa, Schott, Record – Pa

Op. 49, Concerto for violin and orchestra No. 2, (1978) 16:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su
Czech, Prague premiere by the Czech Philharmonic, 1980

Op. 50, Jarni Píšťtalky (Spring Whistles) Octet for wind instruments, (1979)10:00. Score – Pa

Op. 51, “Dawn”, “Autumn”, Choir (1979)

Op. 52, Three Polkas for piano, (1979) 12:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su

Op. 53, Aquarelles for Harpsichord, 3 parts, (1979) 13:00. Score – ČHF

Op. 54, Two Worlds (Dva světy) Ballet on Lewis Carrol’s “Alice in Wonderland” for large orchestra, (1980) 24:00.
Score – ČHF, Record – Su

Op. 55, Suite for clarinet and piano, 3 movts., (1981) 9:00. Score – PA

Op. 56, Tristium, concertant fantasie for viola and string orchestra, (1981) 11:00. Score – ČHF, Record – CDM

Op. 57, Piano Sonata, No.3, (1982) 20:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su

Op. 58, Sonata for violin and piano, 3 movts., (1982) 15:00. Score – PA, Record – Pa

Op. 59, Fable for chamber orchestra, (1983) 12:00. Score – ČHF, Record – CDM

Op. 60, 2 choirs to words, (1983) 04:00

Op. 61, Concerto for bassoon and wind instruments, 1 movt., (1983) 11:00. Score – ČHF, Record – Pa

Op. 62, String Quartet No. 4 (Ad honorem J.S.B.) (1984) Score – Pa, Schott

Op. 63, String Quartet No. 5 (In Memory of M. Chagall), (1984) 22:00. Score – Pa, Schott, Record – PA
U.S. Premiere, August, 2008, The Lumina String Quartet, The center for the Arts, Stamford, Connecticut
Ukraine, Odessa Premiere, November 2007, The Lumina String Quartet, International Contemporary Music Festival

Op. 64, Concerto for piano and wind instruments No. 2, (1985) 20:00. Score – ČHF

Op. 65, Canticum Canticorum, cantata for mixed choir, chamber orchestra, alto, tenor, (1986) 14:00, Score – ČHF
U.S. Premiere, Sacred Music in Sacred Space, November 17, 2010, New York, NY

Op. 66, Diptych for Strings, (1987) 15:00. Score – ČHF, Record – Pa (Op. 66 was added)

Op. 67, Duettina for violin and cello, 4 movts., (1987) 08:00

Op. 68, String Quartet No. 6 “In Memory of B. Martinu”, (1987) 15:00. Score – Eds, Record – Pa

Op. 69, Incantation For 13 Wind Instruments, (1988) 10:00. Score – Compusic Amsterdam

Op. 70, Carousel of Life (Kolotoč živvota). Cycle of songs for low voice and piano on words by R. M. Rilke, (1989) 10:00

Op. 71, Four Enigmas for Graham, (1989) 08:00

Op. 72, Strange Pipers (1990), (2 ob, 2 bns, 2 eng hns, cbn) 10:00, Score – Compusic Amsterdam

Op. 73, Four Images for flute and harpsichord, 4 movts., (1991) 16:00. Score – PA

Op. 74, Hallelujah for violin and piano, (1991) 5:00. Record – Pa

Op. 75, Preludio, Aria e Toccata for Harpsichord Solo, “I casi di Sisyphos”, (1992) 10:00. Score – PA/Schott

Op. 76, String Quartet No. 7, (1993). 14:00

Op. 77, Dialogues, for violoncello and harpsichord, 4 movts., (1993) 14:00

Op. 78, Fantasie for oboe and piano, (1995) 10:00

Op. 79, Duettina for cello and double bass, 3 movts., (1994), 07:00

Op. 80, “Tempting” for flute solo, (1985), 10:00, Score – PA, Schott

Op. 81, Znělka pro lyru Pragnensis/Seifert, 1996

op. 82, Ludus for piano quartet, (1996) 8:00. Score – Schott
U.S. Premiere, November 20, 2008, Washington Musica Viva, at the Embassy of the Czech Republic.

Op. 83, Three Monologues for Cello Solo, (1996) 11:00. PA

Op. 84, Sonata for viola and piano, 1 movt. (1997) 10:00

Op. 85, Capriccio for Two Violins and Piano (1998)

Op. 86, Rondo Drammatico for cello solo (1999) 4:40. Schott

Op. 87, Impressions for two clarinets, 3 movts., (1999). PA .
U.S. Premiere, the Lumina String Quartet, 2008, Stamford, Connecticut

Op. 88, Toccatas for piano (1999). PA/Schott

Op. 89, Allegro impetuoso for piano (1999). PA/Schott

Op. 90, French horn Invocation for French horn solo (2000). Schott, Eds

Op. 91, Small Suite for two bassoons, 3 movts., (2000). PA

Op. 92, Couples for two flutes, 3 movts.,(2003). The last work of Viktor Kalabis, PA

Publishers:

ČFH – Materials for hire are available at Czech Music Fund

Hire Library, Radlická 99, 150 00 Praha 5

Eds – Editio Suparaphon, Chopinova 4, 120 00 Praha 2

CDM –  Le chant du Monde – Harmonia Mundi

Pa –       Panton International Praha (sheet music)

Pa –       Panton (recordings)

Su –       Supraphon Records – Bonton Music

Schott – Schott Music Publishing

Compositions for Large Orchestra

Symphony No. 1, Op. 14, (1957) 36:00. Score – Eds
Symphony No. 2 “Sinfonia pacis”, Op. 18, (1961) 27:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su, CDM
Symphonic Variations, Op. 24, (1964) 12:00. Score – PA, Schott, Record – Su
Concerto for large orchestra, 4 movts., Op. 25, (1966) 36:00. Score – Pa, Schott, Record – Su
Symphony No. 3, Op. 33, (1971) 25:00. Score – Pa, Schott, Record – Pa, CDM
U.S. Stamford, Connecticut Premiere by Stamford Symphony Orchestra, April 25, 1999
Germany, Münster premiere by the Dresdner Staatskapelle, 1972
Symphony No. 4, Op. 34, (1972) 23:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su
Czech, Prague premiere by Czech Philharmonic, 1975,
Premiered by the Dresdner Staatskapelle, 1975
Symphony No. 5, “Fragment”, Op. 43, (1976) 15:00. Score – Pa, Schott. Record – Pa, CDM
U.S. Washington DC premiere by the Washington Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra performed 7 times, 1994

Compositions for Chamber or String Orchestra

Concerto for Chamber Orchestra “Hommage a Stravinskij”, 3 movts., Op. 3, (1948) 16:00.  Score – ČHF

Chamber Music for String, Op. 21, (1963) 17:00. Score – Pa, Schott, Record – Su

Fable for chamber orchestra, Op. 59, (1983) 12:00. Score – ČHF, Record – CDM

Diptych for Strings, Op. 66, (1987) 15:00. Score – ČHF, Record – Pa

Suita for orchestra “Festival of Straznice”, 5 parts, Op. 9, (1953) 28:00. Score – ČHF

Classical Nonet, 4 movts., Op. 13, (1956) 20:00. Score – ČHF

Instrumental Concertos

Concerto for violoncello and orchestra, 3 movts., Op. 8, (1951). 35:00. Score – Eds
Concerto for piano and orchestra No. 1, Op. 12, (1954) 20:00. Score – Pa. Record – Su
Czech, Prague premiered 1957, The Prague Spring Festival by Prague Chamber Orchestra
Soviet Union, Moscow premiered, 1957 by All Union Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra

Concerto for violin and orchestra No. 1, Op. 17, (1959) 21:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su
Concerto for trumpet and orchestra (“Le Tambour de Villevielle”), Op. 36, (1973) 16:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su
Concerto for harpsichord and string orchestra, Op. 42, (1975) 27:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su
US, Washington DC premiere by the Washington Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra performed 7 times, 1994

Concerto for violin and orchestra No. 2, Op. 49, (1978) 16:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su
Czech, Prague premiere by the Czech Philharmonic, 1980

Tristium, concertant fantasie for viola and string orchestra, Op. 56, (1981) 11:00. Score – ČHF, Record – CDM
Concerto for bassoon and wind instruments, 1 movt., Op. 61, (1983) 11:00. Score – ČHF, Record – Pa
Concerto for piano and wind instruments No. 2, Op. 64, (1985) 20:00. Score – ČHF

String Quartets

String Quartet No. 1, Op, 6, (1949) 20:00
String Quartet No. 2, Op. 19, (1962) 20:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su
String Quartet No. 3, Op. 48, (1977) 19:00. Score – Pa, Schott, Record – Pa
String Quartet No. 4 (Ad honorem J.S.B.) Op. 62, (1984) Score – Pa, Schott
String Quartet No. 5 (In Memory of M. Chagall), Op. 63, (1984) 22:00. Score – Pa, Schott, Record – PA
U.S. Premiere, August, 2008, The Lumina String Quartet, The center for the Arts, Stamford, Connecticut
Ukraine, Odessa Premiere, November 2007, The Lumina String Quartet, International Contemporary Music Festival
String Quartet No. 6 “In Memory of B. Martinu”, Op. 68, (1987) 15:00. Score – Eds, Record – Pa
String Quartet No. 7, Op. 76, (1993). 14:00

Compositions for Various Wind Ensembles

Divertimento for Wind Quintet, 5 parts, Op. 10, (1952) 17:00. Score – čHF, Record – Su.
Small Chamber Music for Wind Quintet, 3 movts., Op. 27, (1967) 11:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su, Pa
Nonet “Homage to Nature”, 4 movts., Op. 44, No.2. (1976) 22:00. Score – ČHF, Record – Su
Jarni Píšťtalky (Spring Whistles) Octet for wind instruments, Op. 50, (1979)10:00. Score – Pa
Incantation For 13 Wind Instruments, Op. 69, (1988) 10:00. Score – Compusic Amsterdam
Strange Pipers, Op. 72, (1990), (2 ob, 2 bns, 2 eng hns, cbn) 10:00, Score – Compusic Amsterdam
Impressions for two clarinets, 3 movts., Op. 87, (1999). PA .
U.S. Premiere, the Lumina String Quartet, 2008, Stamford, Connecticut
Small Suite for two bassoons, 3 movts., Op. 91, (2000). PA
Couples for two flutes, 3 movts., Op. 92, (2003). The last work of Viktor Kalabis, PA

Compositions for Chamber Ensemble with Piano

Trio for Violin Cello and Piano, Op. 39, (1974) 15:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su
U.S. Premiere, November 20, 2008, Washington Musica Viva, at the Embassy of the Czech Republic.

Small Suite for two bassoons, 3 movts., Op. 91, (2000). PA

Ludus for piano quartet, Op. 82, (1996) 8:00. Score – Schott
U.S. Premiere, November 20, 2008, Washington Musica Viva, at the Embassy of the Czech Republic.

Capriccio for Two Violins and Piano Op. 85, (1998)

Duo with Piano

Suite for Oboe and Piano “Bagpiper”, Op. 11, (1953), 15:00. Score – Eds
Sonata for cello and piano, 3 movts., Op. 29, (1968-9) 18:00. Score – Pa, Schott, Record – Pa
Sonata for clarinet and piano, 3 movts. , Op. 30, (1969) 18:00. Score – Pa, Record – Pa
Variations for French horn and piano, Op. 31, (1969) 8:00. Score – Schott, Eds, Record – Su
Sonata for trombone and piano, 2 movts., Op. 32, (1970) 15:00. Score – Schott, Record – Su
Suite for clarinet and piano, 3 movts., Op. 55, (1981) 9:00. Score – PA
Sonata for violin and piano, 3 movts., Op. 58, (1982) 15:00. Score – PA, Record – Pa
Hallelujah for violin and piano, Op. 74, (1991) 5:00. Record – Pa
Sonata for viola and piano, 1 movt. Op. 84, (1997) 10:00
Fantasie for oboe and piano, Op. 78, (1995) 10:00

Duos with Harpsichord

Sonata for violin and harpsichord, 3 movts., Op. 28, (1967) 15:00. Score- Eds, Record – Su
Four Images for flute and harpsichord, 4 movts., Op. 73, (1991) 16:00. Score – PA
Dialogues, for violoncello and harpsichord, 4 movts., Op. 77, (1993) 14:00

Duos for Strings

Duettina for violin and cello, 4 movts., Op. 67, (1987) 08:00
Duettina for cello and double bass, 3 movts., Op. 79, (1994) 07:00

Piano Compositions

Piano Sonata No. 1, dedicated “To my dear mother”, Op. 2, (1947) 13:00
Sonata, 2 movts., OP. 4, (1948) 17:00. Score – PA, Schott
Accents, cycle of piano studies of interpretation, Op. 26, (1967) 8 parts, 18:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su
Entrata, Aria e Toccata for piano, 3 movts., Op. 41, (1975) 10:00. Score – Eds
Three Polkas for piano, Op. 52, (1979) 12:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su
Piano Sonata, No.3, Op. 57, (1982) 20:00. Score – Eds, Record – Su
Four Enigmas for Graham, Op. 71, (1989) 08:00
Toccatas for piano Op. 88, (1999). PA/Schott
Op. 89, Allegro impetuoso for piano (1999). PA/Schott

Harpsichord Compositions

Six Two-Voice Canonic Inventions for Harpsichord, Op. 20, (1962) 13:00. Score – Schott, Pa, Record – Su
Aquarelles for Harpsichord, 3 parts, Op. 53, (1979) 13:00. Score – ČHF
Preludio, Aria e Toccata for Harpsichord Solo, “I casi di Sisyphos”, Op. 75, (1992) 10:00. Score – PA/Schott

Compositions for Other solo Instruments

Symphonic Fresco for organ (Afresco sinfonico), Op. 22, (1963) 09:00. Score – PA
Three Pieces for Flute, Op. 35 (1973) 08:00. Score – PA / Schott, Record – Pa
Reminiscences for Guitar Solo, Op. 46, (1977) 14:00. Score: Zimmermann, Frankfurt am Main
“Tempting” for flute solo, Op. 80, (1985), 10:00, Score – PA, Schott
Three Monologues for Cello Solo, Op. 83, (1996) 11:00. PA
Rondo Drammatico for cello solo, Op. 86, (1999) 4:40. Schott
French horn Invocation for French horn solo, Op. 90, (2000). Schott, Eds

Vocal Compositions

“Bird’s Weddings” (Ptaćĺ svatby). Cycle of songs for tenor and piano to folk poetry, OP. 5, (1949) 12:00. Score – Pa
U.S. Premiere, November 20, 2008, Washington Musica Viva, at the Embassy of the Czech Republic.

5 Romantic Love Songs to words by R.M.Rilke for high voice and strings, Op. 38, (1973) 18:00. Score – ČHF, record – Su
“The War” (Vojna) chamber cantata for mixed choir, flute, cimbalom on folk poetry, Op. 45, (1977) 19:00, Score – ČHF
Canticum Canticorum, cantata for mixed choir, chamber orchestra, alto, tenor, Op. 65, (1986) 14:00, Score – ČHF
U.S. Premiere, Sacred Music in Sacred Space, November 17, 2010, New York, NY
Carousel of Life (Kolotoč živvota). Cycle of songs for low voice and piano on words by R. M. Rilke, Op. 70, (1989) 10:00
Children Songs with piano accompaniment, 6 parts, Op. 15, (1958) 12:00, Score – Eds
Album of Folksongs with piano, 20 songs, Op. 23, 30:00.
Songs for Little Children with piano, Op. 37, 05:00. Score – ČHF
We Sing a Song with flute and oboe, 5 two- and three-canonic choirs Op. 40, (1974) 08:00. Score – ČHF
Three Children Choirs (with piano), Op. 47, (1977) 08:00.

Stage Works – Ballet

Two Worlds (Dva světy) Ballet on Lewis Carrol’s “Alice in Wonderland” for large orchestra, Op. 54, (1980) 24:00.
Score – ČHF, Record – Su
Fable for chamber orchestra, Op. 59, (1983) 12:00. Score – ČHF, Record – CDM

Other works

Op. 1, Poučení synovské, (1947)
Op. 7, Ouvertura pro velký orchestra, (1950)
Op. 81, Znělka pro lyru Pragnensis/Seifert, 1996

Note:

ČFH – Materials for hire are available at Czech Music Fund
Eds – Editio Suparaphon

CDM – Le chant du Monde – Harmonia Mundi

Pa – Panton International Praha (sheet music)

Pa – Panton (recordings)

Su – Supraphon Records – Bonton Music

Schott – Schott Music Publishing

Viktor Kalabis Complete Works

Year Category Title Description Audio
Symphony Symphony No. 1, Op. 14, 36′, EPB (1956-7) This symphony opens a new era in Kalabis’s work. He dedicated it to his parents, but also, through the anagram “H-Re-A-D-E-C” to his beloved town Jindrichuv Hradec. The alleged citation of the choral to St. Wenceslas was very much used against this work and made further performances impossible. Now this remarkable work stands in the shadow of his later, much better known symphonies and symphonic works.
Symphony Symphony No. 2 “Sinfonia pacis”, Op. 18, 27′, EPB (1961-2) This is one of Kalabis’s most famous compositions. The Caribbean crisis with humanity on the brink of atomic war, shook his as it shook all of the world. The menacing quiet of the opening Passacaglia, the blind furiosity of the Scherzo the dirge of the slow movement is followed in the Finale by an unfinished, slowly deconstructed Fugue form which, over clanging of bells, a simple children’s ditty evolves. Sergiu Celibidache pronounced the work “one of the greatest Symphonies of the 20th century”. Critics in the western world were enthusiastic, the Wiener Zeitung for example called it “…half prayer, half apocalypse…”. Only between 1963-1971 it was played in Warsaw, Graz Festival, Vienna, Dresden, Budapest, Durban, Munster, Reykjavik, Adelaide and finally by the Berlin Philharmony. In this work Kalabis for the first time consciously uses the quintola of repeated notes, which in his works is a symbol of death. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8joaUIcaGo
Symphony Symphony No. 3, Op. 33, 25′, Schott (1970-71)  The culminating work of the epoch immediately reflecting the times of the so-called Normalization. Its best characterization, maybe, comes in the review: “It was a poignant expression of human suffering by a first-class composer who possibly has created on of the most moving works of our time. One listened with tears in the eyes. How many contemporary works can produce this emotion?” – The Advocate & Greenwich Times, John Sweeney, 2.5.1999, USA. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLzUL4wqOws
Symphony Symphony No. 4, (1972)  Op. 34, 23′, EBP Commissioned by Staatskapelle Dresden & Herbert Blomstedt. The formal conception of the Dramma is complex, with several culminations, the harmony in places almost spectral, then highly charged, stormy and aggressive and again humble and quiet. The trumpets keep warning, the end brings a small ray of light.” – Jiri Pilka. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEn57-p2HfM
Symphony Symphony No. 5, “Fragment”, Op. 43, 15′, Schott (1975-6) The name of this work consisting of just one movement does not refer to any fragmentary character of the music itself. It is derived from the source of its inspiration, the unfinished “Pieta degli Rondanini” by Michelangelo. Kalabis himself did comment: “The absolute perfection of Moses and David seems unsurpassable and I could not believe that it is possible to arrive at yet greater economy of expression.” All the attention is on the central message, not diluting it in any way.
Symphonic Music Suita for orchestra “Festival of Straznice”, Op. 9, 5 parts, 28′ – 29′, CHF (1953) Named after a famous folklore festival, it has been unjustly overshadowed by his other orchestral works, mainly the symphonies.
Symphonic Music Symphonic Variations, Op. 24, 12′ – 14′, PA / Schott They were written at the request of V. Neumann for the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra. The author commented: “The theme is man — at first guideless, pure, even naive. We don’t know what he is going to become. The first variations see him from outside, then more and more the inside is revealed with all its complications and problems leading to tragedy. It is the ancient Greek Fatum. One of the few of my works where I could not find a catharsis.” Dr. Jiri Pilka, musicologist and Kalabis’s biographer, finds tha tthe work emanates “a controversy between dream and reality… almost Kafkaesque horror.” httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dp-WYXqgsqA
Symphonic Music Concerto for large orchestra, Op. 25, 25′, 4 movts., Schott Again written for the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, this time at the instigation of Karel Ancerl, who asked for a representative work, which would show the excellent qualities of his orchestra. Though, as Kalabis commented, “smiling through tears”, it is full of luminous virtuosity and infinitely more optimistic than the variations.
Composition for chamber orchestra Diptych for string orchestra, Op. 66, 15′, Schott (1987) Kalabis characterizes laconically: “an intimate work, chaste of expression. Less tragic than other works. A study of new sonic possibilities of string ensemble.” The Diptych was chosen by Edward Heath for his concert at the Prague Spring Festival in 1988. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6lPznunJGPc
Composition for chamber orchestra Chamber Music for String, Op. 21, 18′, Schott Literary News 7.3.1964 writes: “introvert music…a detailed analysis would reveal how many principally new values it reveals and with what security Kalabis handles them.” Sachsisches Tagesblatt, 18.3.1966: “the old and the new seamlessly united…a work of rich meaning…” httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QMaRqmdtVo
Composition for chamber orchestra Concerto for Chamber Orchestra “Hommage a Stravinskij”, Op. 3, 3 movts., 17′ – 20′, CHF (1948) “This work, as implied in the title, is a homage, in a way even paraphrasing Stravinski’s heterophony and instrumentation (1st and 3rd movement). The slow movement is more personal, lyrical,” says the author.
String quartets String Quartet No. 1, Op. 6, 22′ – 24′ “The quartet with its stupefying Beethovian tensions is a superb discovery.” – Stephan Frierderich (www.quobuz.com, June 2010)
String quartets String Quartet No. 2, Op. 19,  14′ – 16′ This work, consisting of a Prologue, Dramma and Epilogue, a form later often used by Kalabis, is dedicated to his father and written under the shadow of his nearing death. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DXzT8FUeZoU
String quartets String Quartet No. 3, Op. 48, 19′, Schott (1977) This work is temperamental, full of life, offering some parallels to the inspriations by nature in the Trio and the second nonet. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dc1mvj-xBzs
String quartets String Quartet No. 4, Op. 62, 12′, Schott (1983-4) The work bears the dedication “Ad honorem J.S. Bach” but it has yet another source of inspiration, which could not be disclosed at the time. Kalabis mentions the Hamlet monologue but actually it was Shakespeare’s 66th Sonnet, with its passionate accusation of time and society. Bach offers a solution — the eternal, spiritual. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FiYhUkAnieg
String quartets String Quartet No. 5 (“In Memory of M. Chagall”), Op. 63, 22′, Schott (1984) “To be a Jew is a Fate and a way of thinking,” said Kalabis. Setting aside all inspirations by folklore or religious music, Kalabis in this work goes to the very core of Jewish soul. Vitality, tenderness, grief and tears, playfulness alongside deep philosophy, fiddlers playing their hearts out on roofs and in the skies, all this is expressed in this quartet, inspired by Marc Chagall’s paintings “Over Vitebsk” and “The Green Fiddler” and dedicated to him. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DCZ7Ttj5dYI
String quartets String Quartet No. 6 (“In Memory of B. Martinu”), Op. 68, 16′ – 17′, EBP (1988) Dedication: “To the memory of Bohuslav Matrinu”. Kalabis’s commentary: “A sincere affinity and respected inspired this work…there is no citing or paraphrasing of Martinu’s works, nor do I try to emulate his style. It is the sunny, human quality, the genuine purity of both his work and his person, which was at the core of my inspiration.” httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NNyKtZfL50
String quartets String Quartet No. 7, Op. 76, 1 movt., 16′ (1994) Quartets, as their author says, are as important to him as the symphonies, only at a more intimate level. “…A diary, a confessional.” “Fascinating and highly enigmatic, in one movement.” (Diapason, May 2010, under “Discoveries”, Patrick Szersnovicz).
Duos with harpsichord Sonata for violin and harpsichord, Op. 28, 3 movts., 15′-16′, EBP (1967) This opus is dedicated to the duo J. Suk and Zuzana Ruzichova who requested it. The work, though only 15 minutes long, is an important one, serious, meant to be played alongside with Bach and Handel, but without any baroque connatations. Dr. Pila takes it to be one of the most substantial in the author’s work. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UE1j5vgDu8k
Duos with harpsichord Dialogues for violoncello and harpsichord, Op. 77, 4 movts., 10′ – 12′ (1994) Requested by Janos Starker after a concert with Zuzana Ruzickova in Prague: it is also dedicated to him. According to his wish it is a Divertimento in four parts, three fast, one slow, very colorful, sometimes motoric, sometimes considerably agitated and mainly in its finale written for a virtuoso player obvioulsy with Starker in mind.”
Duos with harpsichord Four Pictures for flute and harpsichord, Op. 73, 4 movts., 17′, PA (1991) Kalabis again in his happy, playful, reminiscent, sometimes ironical mood.
Piano quartet Ludus for piano quartet op. 82, 8′, Schott (1996) “A play of four” Kalabis aims to give equal playing space to all the instruments, not overloading the piano part, as is often the case. It is written in one sole movement with short slow part in the middle. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqSVXAxqdUo
Instrumental concertos Concerto for piano and orchestra No. 1, Op. 12, 20′, Schott (1953-4) httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aa6sHGIkVEM
Instrumental concertos Concerto for piano and wind instruments No. 2, Op. 64, 19′ – 21′, CHF (1985) It brings an unusual confrontation of piano with rather strong woodwind and brass ensemble (big symphonic brass, woodwind a 3). First work after Kalabis’s surgery it is an outburst of vitality and strength, a joy of danger surpassed.
Instrumental concertos Concerto for violin and orchestra No. 1, Op. 17, 21′ – 23′, EBP (1958-9) httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FLyCpypi55I
Instrumental concertos Concerto for violin and orchestra No. 2, Op. 49, 15′ – 16′, EBP (1977-8) httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Ajx9Kom2qA
Instrumental concertos Concerto for harpsichord and string orchestra, Op. 42, 23′ – 25′, EBP (1974-5) If there is a recurrent theme in Kalabis’s work, as there is in the owrk of many artists, it is the sadness of the fleeting fate of human life, both in its individual and collective form. The Harpsichord Concerto, too, expresses this idea: the budding fragrance of he first movement, the foreboding of the second one, the temperamental lust for life in the first part of the Finale followed by a resigned, calm yet tragic ending. Another, quite unique value of this concerto, a really pioneer undertaking, is giving the harpsichord a real, serious virtuoso part as in any piano concert since Beethoven, not trying to solve the discrepancy between its small sound by either using the concerto grosso technique or using it just as a color. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0I8BhWq_PXA&list=OLAK5uy_nVpxsFjb6MolCvEPOplRFCXLRQwPiCOrM
Instrumental concertos Tristium, Fantasia Concertante for viola and string orchestra, Op. 56, 10′ – 13′, CHF (1981) A dear friend of the family, Kalabis’s former schoolmate underwent a strenuous fight with cancer, which in the end, was lost. It is so full of poignancy, of futile struggle between life and death, of alternating hope and despair one cannot but be deeply moved by it.
Instrumental concertos Concerto for violoncello and orchestra, Op. 8, 3 movts., 35′ – 36′, EBP This work was born under good auspices. Not only did the famous cellist Milos Sadlo give the first performance, but  Manuel Rosenthal chose to play it with Jacques Neilz and the Orchestre National de Paris in 1957. He pronounced it to be: “full of colour, temperament, yet serious. Kalabis continues in the great tradition of his country’s famous masters.”
Instrumental concertos Concerto for trumpet and orchestra (“Le Tambour de Villevielle”), Op. 36, 3 movts., 15′ – 16′, EBP (1973) Michel Garcin, artistic director of ERATO, asked Zuzana Ruzickova to play at a festival organized by him in his native town in the Provence. Kalabis was allowed to accompany her. He acquired a statuette of Provencal folklore, a village tambour, slightly comical, a war veteran in unifrom, maybe an invalid, a cap with the inevitable tricolor over his mustached face. Kalabis remembered a similar figure in his childhood. In the Concerto there is the whole of the old tambour’s fate, trumpets and drums, war and glory, comedy and death.
Instrumental concertos Concerto for bassoon and wind instruments, Op. 61, 1 movt., 10′ – 11′, EBP (1983) In one movement, it was meant by its author to be an “intellectual” plaything, “a toy”, in a which he wanted to set the bassoon in his words “a merry bloke who never spoils a joke”, against a group of its own kind.
Composition for wind instruments Incantation – Tredecet for 2 Fl., Ob., Cor ingl., 2 Cl, 4 Cor, 2 Bsn, Op. 69, 1 movt., 11′ – 13′, ed. “Compmusic” Amsterdam (1988) The Incantations are written in a more serious mood than the “Reedpipes”, the author mentioned ancient magic, sorcery, witchcraft, more mysterious than sad.
Composition for wind instruments Septet “Strange Pipers” for 2 Ob, 2 Cor ingl., 2 Bsn, CBsn, Op. 72, 1 movts., 8’30” – 10′, ed. “Compmusic” Amsterdam (1990) Kalabis chose this time only double-reed instruments, and speaks of “a boyish harshness”. The strange combination of playful gamin parts with oddly momentous, complicated polyphonic and harmonic structures, together with the weird sound of double-reeds, gives this work an importance not to be surmised from its title.
Composition for wind instruments Octet “Spring Whistles” for 2 Ob, 2 Cl, 2 Cor, 2 Bsn (1979), Op. 50, 10′, Schott Kalabis says: “My spring inspirations obsess me already for some time and the sound of reed pipes with children carve out of willows before Easter belongs to this mood. The critic in the “Stuttgarter Zeitung (Bach Tage 19) points out: “…a most interesting work, with clashing dissonances and polymetric structure, which sometimes deny its innocent title”.
Composition for wind instruments Divertimento for Wind Quintet, Op. 10, 5 parts, 17′ – 18′, CHF (1952) This work has been played all over the world, for example in Germany, Holland, Austria, Denmark, Italy, Yugoslavia, Poland, Australia, New Zealand and Indonesia, and was awarded 3rd prize at the festival of contemporary music in Warsaw. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SzY5ADntXzc
Composition for wind instruments Small Chamber Music for wind quintet, Op. 27, 3 movts., 11′ – 12′, EBP (1967) “Woodwind usually brings a joyous mood” the author quoted. Indeed a scintillating, unrestrained joy and virtuosity akes this opus a popular one, widely played by ensembles at home and abroad. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SFoXaEnIusQ
Duo with piano Sonata for violin and piano, Op. 58, 3 movts., 15′ – 18′, PA (1982) Let us say with the author and his comment: “a work in three movements, the usual fast-slow-fast scheme. The average listener will not detect any “innovations”, though I think there are some, but not too spectacular and serving the cause of music alone. My aim is always the same — to write music for the educated listener…”.
Duo with piano Hallelujah for violin and piano, Op. 74, 3rd part of the “Three Old Testament Frescoes” (1st part by P.Eben, 2nd part by O.F.Korte), 6′ – 7′ (20′ all parts), PA (1992) The work is part of a trilogy on biblical theme by three important Czech composers, requested by Edna Michell, Menuhins disciple well known in Israel and the USA. While Petr Eben chose “Saul at En-Dor” and Oldrich Korte “Elihu contra Job”, Kalabis wrote the final Hallelujah. He says: “Oh, how I would like to let all strings sound in praise of the Lord! Yet my Hallelujah is a little subdued. We know all about the Shoah, and yet all around us new horrors are happening… I ask: Lord, did it, does it have to be?” And answer there is none. Nevertheless, I keep singing my shy Hallelujah.”
Duo with piano Sonata for viola and piano, Op. 84, 1 movt. “…a mature, manly song from beginning to end fully voiced and full of wisdom, simplicity and charm, equanimity and feeling. A very personal, intimate work” comments Jan Smolik in Hudebni rozhledy. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hbxGHB8pQc
Duo with piano Sonata for cello and piano, Op. 29, 3 movts., 18′, Schott and Sonata for clarinet and piano, Op. 30, 3 movts., 21′ – 22′, PA (1968-9) Both were written in the first year of Soviet occupation and reflect the mood of that time. Kalabis commented: “The fundamental conflict of that era — the absolute impossibility of truth prevailing in the existing society — pervaded my mind and all of my wokr. It was necessary to fight, to resist!”
Duo with piano Suite for clarinet and piano, Op. 55, 3 movts., 7′ – 9′, PA (1981) “I like the clarinet,” Kalabis said “for its objectivity, its ability to distance itself from any “sweaty” emotionality. That is the reason why I entrust it with most exacting tasks. Suite (“Bagpiper’s”) for oboe and piano, Op. 11, 7 movts., 15′ – 18′, EBP
Duo with piano Fantasie for oboe and piano, Op. 78, 8′ – 10′ (1995) It is the only serious work Kalabis wrote for this instrument, which he found “too pastoral”. It is nevertheless rich in expression as well as in sound and color.
Duo with piano Variations for French horn and piano, Op. 31, 8′, PA, Schott (1969)
Duo with piano Sonata for trombone and piano, Op. 32, 2 movts., 15′ Schott (1968-70) Even in those “instructive” works, commissioned by Schott, Mainz the atmosphere of the so-called “normalization” evident. The Sonata for trombone especially abounds in clusters, bitonality and irregular rhythms. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oddq5YMtdBw
Composition for solo instrument Piano Accents (Expressive studies for piano), Op. 26, 8 parts, 16′ – 18′, EBP (1967) Characterized by Kalabis as “Etudes in interpretation”. They transcend any instructive purpose, are often played in concert and have been several times recorded.
Composition for solo instrument Entrata, Aria e Toccata for piano, Op. 41, 3 movts., EBP 3 (1975) Quasi-baroque in form, modern in its content, it uses color as a tectonic element. The toccata, of course, is a virtuoso “piece de resistance”.
Composition for solo instrument Polkas for piano, Op. 52, 11′, EBP
4 (1979) Kalabis comments: “Polka for a long time it tempted and challenged me. It reflects part of the Czech soul. Sometimes swaggering, sometimes tender, with a strange melancholy. And the need for maximm simplicity, also typical of the Czech character. Simplicity is not naive, sometimes it is more sophisticated than complex strucures. You find it in the polkas of Smetana, Dvorak and Martinu.”
Composition for solo instrument Enigmas for Graham, Op. 71, 11′ – 12′ 2 (1989) Written as a birthday surprise for a dear friend of the family, Graham Melville-mason, a longstanding propagator of Czech music. President of the Dvorak Society in Britain, consultant of the Prague Spring Festival and closely connected with the BBC. Kalabis elected the cryptogram g-re a-h-a-mi, which he uses in four parts of a little suite, a clever musical conundrum ending in an almost jazzy, syncopated last movement.
Composition for solo instrument Toccatas for piano, Op. 88, PA / Schott
Allegro impetuoso for piano, Op. 89, PA / Schott
Composition for solo instrument Piano Sonata No. 1, Op. 2, dedicated “To my dear mother”, 3 movts., 13’30” – 15′, PA / Schott II (1947) Here already at the very beginning, Kalabis formulates his aesthetic criteria which he maintained all his life: “…my roots are in tradition which I want to expand, keeping the traditional means and putting them into new contexts. These ensure from the dynamism of my life, i.e. from the present, the contemporary.”
Composition for solo instrument Sonata, Op. 4, 2 movts., 17′ – 19”, PA / Schott II “At the end of 1948, it was a defiant reaction to political development.”
Composition for solo instrument Sonata, Op. 57, 2 movts., 16′ – 19”, EBP (1982) To quote J. Pilka: “…the music (of the Prologue) is full of questions, of light and haze…Of the Dramma Kalabis said in a private conversation “…crying out, spitting out all the anger and gaining an own inner victor…” httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIIDGE_NuNU
Composition for solo instrument Six Two-Part Canonic Inventions for Harpsichord, Op. 20, 14′ – 16′ Schott Kalabis with his mastery of harmony and polyphony created a work of “scintillating sound, showing both deep inner feeling and a rare sense of humor”. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIrby6A4n-M&list=PL7gXyGkmQui9Z5w02sKZReus3ylIdZplp
Composition for solo instrument Aquarelles, Op. 53, 3 parts, 8′ – 11′, CHF (1979) “I love this instrument for the beauty of its sound, for its quiet monumentality and last but not least for the demands it makes on the composer. Unmercifully it reveals any insincerity or posuting. In the Acquarelles I used the colors of the harpsichord to express almost orchestral instrumentation in what, to myself, I call ‘transplantation’.” The first part is one of Kalabis’s “Spring” moods, the second a meditation, ironically commented by “a little devil” or even “death” in the form of lute register, the third a “ballabile” full of light and shadow. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QXPdrzaVXbc
Composition for solo instrument Preludio, Aria e Toccata for Harpsichord Solo, (“I casi di Sisyphos”), Op. 75, 10′ – 12′, PA / Schott (1992) Zuzana Ruzickova commented: “This time Kalabis works not in acquarel but with a full brush.” The programme pictures an ancient myth: King Sisyphos endlessly trying to push a boulder up the slope from which it inevitably falls as decreed by fate. The fate of Man, which Sisyphos mourns.
Composition for solo instrument Three Monologues for Cello Solo, Op. 83, 12′, PA Kalabis wrote them for the famous cellist Milos Sadlo, to celebrate his 85th birthday. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HKE4Q5C-vuc
Composition for solo instrument Rondo Drammatico for cello solo, Op. 86, 4’40”, Schott It is another composition written on commission by the Prague Spring Festival International Competition. Dramatic chords and passages, an anguished, plaintive theme in the highest registers all that will show both the players virtuosity and musicality. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEDIbr5d4tQ
Composition for solo instrument Three Pieces for Flute, Op. 35, 7′ – 8′, PA / Schott (1973) This was an obligatory piece at the Prague Spring International Competition.
Composition for solo instrument “Tempting” for flute, Op. 80, 8′ – 12′, PA / Schott The flute keeps calling, tempting, luring in waves of passages, trills and extreme registers. In the end the calling dies away into silence.
Composition for solo instrument French horn Invocation for French horn solo, Op. 90, EBP The work was commissioned for the International Competition in Brno. It was immediately printed by Schott Ed.
Composition for solo instrument Guitar ”Reminiscences”, Op. 46, 5 parts, 13′- 19′, score: Zimmermann, Frankfurt am Main (1977) “I wanted to take a rest from polyphony and complicated scores. They are not to be taken too seriously. The five pieces are cheerful, sometimes naughty, sometimes ironic, meant to amuse…” (printed by Zimmerman Editions in Frankfurt).
Composition for solo instrument Organ Symphonic Fresco for organ (Afresco sinfonico), Op. 22, 9′ – 11′, PA
Duo for other instrumentation Duettina for violin and cello, Op. 67, 4 movts., 9′ – 12′ (1987) “Introduzione-Danzetta-Serenata and Finale”, using often the technique of Cannon gives large scope for virtuosity.
Duo for other instrumentation Duettina for cello and double bass, Op. 79, 3 movts., 7′ – 8′ 3
Duo for other instrumentation Impressions for two clarinets, Op. 87, 3 movts., PA; Small Suite for two bassoons, Op. 91, 3 movts., PA; Couples for two flutes, Op. 92, 3 movts., PA The three compositions for woodwind duos are the last Kalabis was able to write down. yet, as if looking to music to restore his inner balance and overcome the dark side of life so often depicted in his work, the three duets which he well knew were to be his last, are cheerful, witty, full of mirth and humor. Jan Smolik (Hudebni rozhledy) wrote: “Were there a prize of the audience, in this case it would surely have gone to Kalabis, so long and ecstatic was the applause. The Interprets premiered it with wit, bravura and elegance and evidently had a good time themselves. Can on desire more?” Concerning Op. 91, Jan Smolik writes: “There is a lot of mature musicianship in this “little” suite. It is witty, “light” music in supreme taste. It has a dramatic as well as playful moments, the two bassoons even get to “swing” a little, every thing flows naturally…”. Op. 92, the last of the trilogy, not departing from its general character of cheerful humor, it is also the last work of Viktor Kalabis. In 2003 he had to stop writing.
Vocal Composition “Canticum canticorum” for mixed choir, chamber orchestra, alto, tenor, Op. 65, 13′ – 14′, CHF (1985-6) A cantata for alto and tenor solo, mixed choir and chamber orchestra. The work was commissioned by Helmuth Rilling for his “Gaechinger Kantorei” choir. Kalabis selected part of the biblical Song of Songs. Framed, like a picture, by trumpet fanfares, it presents, in Kalabis’s words, “a brief glimpse of a biblical landscape” and “an expression of the greatest gift of life, love between man and woman”.
Vocal Composition “The War” for mixed choir, flute, cimbalon (piano) on folk poetry, Op. 45, 18′, CHF
Vocal Composition 5 Romantic Love Songs to words by R.M.Rilke, Op. 38, 15′, EBP (1974) It is an expression of deep affinity to Rilke’s poetry, its vulnerable fragility, tenderness, polyvalence and ingerent museic. The “romanticism” indicated in the title does not apply to style, but rather to inner content — which of course is love. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VSuZE49NbIA
Vocal Composition “Bird’s Weddings” for higher voice and piano  8 songs, Op. 5, 12′- 14′, PA / Schott. Part serious, part jocular texts mainly about love and family life. Kalabis joked: “It was my wedding ad.” httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-SJsFswVpA
Vocal Composition “Carousel of Life” for lower voice and piano to words by R.M.Rilke, Op. 70, 5 songs, 11′ – 12′ (1989) Kalabis’s second cycle on Rilke, it speaks with the poet of the seemingly senseless roundabout of human existence, of solitude, sadness and anguish, touching on a Czech theme and inevitably, death.
Vocal Composition “Dawn”, Op. 51, “Autumn”, Op. 60, 2 choirs to words by Vl. Sefl, 4′- 3′
Vocal Composition Children Songs (with piano accompaniment), Op. 15, 6 parts, 12′, EBP Today, these are as popular as folk-songs.
Vocal Composition Album of Folksongs (with piano), Op. 23, 20 songs, 30′, SHV 4
Vocal Composition Songs for Little Children (with piano), Op. 37, 5′, CHF
Vocal Composition We Sing a Song (with flute and oboe), Op. 40, 5 two- and three-canonic choirs, 6′- 8′, CHF (1974) The “Cannons” are far from simple, rich in polyphonic structure.
Vocal Composition Three Children Choirs (with piano), Op. 47, 6′- 8′ (1977-8) As usual between important works Kalabis writes something for “his” choir, this time joking comparing musical instruments with animals (Bears and Bass, Violins and blackbirds, etc.). httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ci2UAayvaNo
Nonets Classical Nonet, Op. 13, 4 movts., 18′ – 21′, CHF II (1955-6) Plays once more — this time with some subtle irony — with Mozart inspirations.
Nonets Nonet (“Homage to Nature”), Op. 44, 4 movts., 19′ – 22′, EBP (1976) Kalabis comments: “Standing at the shore of one of the South Bohemian lakes you feel at one with this beauty and you feel joy at purely biological existence. And while you are not able to sing with the birds, you have to sit down and confide it to paper”.
Ballets “Two Worlds” (loosely based on Lewis Carrol’s “Alice in Wonderland”) for symphony orchestra, Op. 54,  2 parts, 25′ The first and only directly scenic work by Kalabis is based freely on “Alice in Wonderland”. Like the original “Alice” it is not just for children and as such it was conceived in the remarkable TV version which used, besides a reknown ballet group (Pavel Smok) also a little girl for Alice, techniques of “black theatre”, “Laterna Magica” and a live cat. In the USA it won together with Tchaikovski’s Swan Lake and Prokofiev’s Cinderella in the Parent’s Choice Award. httpa://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wj6eaNphc5M
Ballets “Fable” for chamber orchestra, Op. 59, 12′ – 14′” (1983) “Serious music does not necessarily have to be serious,” said Kalabis. “From time to time the author craves a laugh. The Fable comes from the world of 16th century Comedia dell arte. It could even be performed by a small ballet or mime group. The actors enter (Introduzione) — Harlequin, Colombine, Pantalone. The ensuing drama is a burlesque, nothing very serious happens. “I rely on the listener to use his fantasy. The final Morale and actors taking their bows form the “Conclusione”.
Other Works Piano Sonata No. 1, Op. 2, dedicated “To my dear mother” (1947) Here already at the very beginning, Kalabis formulates his aesthetic criteria which he maintained all his life: “…my roots are in tradition which I want to expand, keeping the traditional means and putting them into new contexts. These ensure from the dynamism of my life, i.e. from the present, the contemporary.”
Other Works Four Nursery Songs  Won him a prize at a competition of children’s choirs.
Other Works Trio for Violin Cello and Piano, Op. 39 (1974) Dr. Pilka writes: “though chamber music, like the Sonata for Violin and Harpsichord this is to my mind a fundamental work, essential for grasping Kalabis’s entire personality”. The very special effect of the “inner space”, not the natural but a very special spiritual, almost ritualistic space, philosophically inherent in Kalabis’s work, is very much in evidence. The “Revue du Disque” (S.M. 1979), calls it “one of the most interesting works of Czech contemporary music…”. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIrby6A4n-M&list=OLAK5uy_lGuc-YOb57eJJg4RXFMHyTh6m3_K5CLOc
Other Works Capriccio for Two Violins and Piano, Op. 85 Jan Smolik writes: “It was the peak of the evening. In the words of its author the Capriccio was written out of pure joy of music and indeed transmits this joy entirely.” On top of it Kalabis decided to send a musical greeting to his two beloved masters — Stravinsky and Martinu…”